A report from Tina Viney – CEO of the Aesthetics Practitioners Advisory Network (APAN)

This week I participated in two regulatory meetings that will be introducing new standards and mandatory requirements.  The first meeting was about:

  •  Proposed new Regulations of products commonly used in Cosmetic Procedures.

At the invitation of the NSW Minister of Health I was invited to participate in a targeted consultation process reviewing the whole process of cosmetic injectables.  While the matters discussed at this meeting at this stage are confidential, I will present here a brief outline of the key objectives.  The review will examine who can administer these treatments, the issue of how the drugs are handled and stored, as well as the role of the doctor, the nurse and also the salon or clinic that is introducing these treatments.

The new regulations will be adding clauses to existing mandated requirements of existing regulations and will aim to establish stronger measures in the area of scope of practice, mandated record keeping and ensuring substances are not counterfeit.  It will also review the obligations and responsibilities of the various parties involved to minimise risk and protect the public.

This review has come about as a result of several concerns that are currently reported including:

  • The increase of the use of non-regulated fillers
  • Procedures delivered by individuals who are operating outside of their scope of practice
  • The constant rise in complications and adverse reactions particularly with fillers
  • Injectables administered in homes instead of registered facilities

Additionally, this week I was invited to attend and join the Australian Standards Technical Committee HE-023.  This committee’s role is to review and establish standards for:

  • Processing of Medical and Surgical Instruments

As far as our industry is concerned, we will be reviewing any implements we use that come in contact with blood or body fluids such as dermal needling, cosmetic tattooing and microblading and possibly plasma technology. I was please to present our industry with greater accuracy as we were referred to as beauticians and were included as part of body art and tattooing sector.

This committee will review both implements, as well as the facilities in which they will be used. It will determine levels of hazard and establishing risk management processes. As much as possible, these standards will be aligned to international standards such as ISO 14971.

This meeting went for most of the day and I anticipate will be a 12-month process.

Despite the extensive work involved, I feel privileged to accurately represent our industry’s needs ensuring that fair standards and regulations are established that improve safety, without commercial disadvantage to business owners.  It is important that our industry’s voice be heard at the highest level and that the various sectors are correctly represented – beauty therapists, dermal therapists, dermal clinicians and clinical aestheticians, as well as qualified cosmetic tattooists to ensure the decisions made that will affect the various sectors, will best serve their needs and protect the integrity and recognition of the various professional practices.

Part of APAN’S vision and goals is to advocate the continued advancement of standards within the industry.  I promise you that we are on the frontline where these decisions are debated and established.  Join us in our fight for a better future www.apanetwork.com