Unlike rosewater, which comes from the pressed petals of a rose, rosehip oil comes from the actual fruit or rosehip of a rose plant. That’s the little bulb at the base of the flowers that looks a little like a little cherry tomato. Since it doesn’t come from the actual flower, it has more of a woodsy, earthy aroma while rose water smells more flowery.

Found mostly in the mountains of Chile, Argentina, and Southern Africa, rosehips, officially known as rosa canina, are harvested primarily in the late summer and early autumn and then pressed for their oils.

Rosehip oil has a high content of vitamin C (426.00mg per 100g) that provides 710% of one’s daily value.  Vitamin C contributes to protecting cells and boosting the immune system, as well as contributes to the production of collagen.  The vitamin A content in rosehip (87% DV) is not only excellent for skin health but also essential for healthy eyes. Vitamin E (29% DV) contributes to the protection of our cells from the damaging effects of free radicals.  On the other hand, its vitamin K content (42% DV) is essential for blood clotting and plays a key role also in bone health.

Rosehip also contains important mineral with many health benefits, especially manganese (51% DV) – an important mineral for cell protection, healthy bones, connective tissue and metabolism. 

As you can see from its nutritional profile, rosehip oil is quite impressive for both skin health and overall health. Applied topically, rosehip oil skin benefits are so diverse that it will work for just about every skin type, for example:

Dry skin – The composition of the fatty acids in rosehip oil are very compatible to the body’s natural sebum and this makes rosehip oil both healing and regenerative when applied as a skincare ingredient. It not only adds moisture to the skin, it help lock in that moisture, so the skin retains the moisture longer.  

Skin that’s normally not dry but dry in extreme weather – With the winter months upon us normal, and sometimes even oily skin can become quite dry and moisture deficient. Unlike heavy creams or even a lot of cream-based moisturisers, rosehip oil is excellent at protecting the skin from environmental hazards and from becoming dehydrated due to extreme weather conditions.

Oily skin – They say that a diamond can cut a diamond, well that is exactly how oil works on skin. Oil cuts oil which is why rosehip oil is such a good choice for someone with oily skin. It’s even been referred to as a “dry” oil because it absorbs into the skin so quickly and helps maintain the flow of sebum protecting it from solidifying and creating plugs in the pores. Additionally, rose hip oil will not irritate the skin as many moisturisers may do.

Acne-prone skin – Rosehip oil in skincare is non-comedogenic so it will prevent clogged pores which is very important for acne-prone skin.

How can rosehip oil be applied to the skin?

Due to the multiple benefits for the skin rosehip oil is often included in skincare formulations, however it can also be used on its own as a complete skin nutritional formula.  Here are some recommendations:

  • As a facial massage medium
  • Under a mask
  • Following skin exfoliation such as post microdermabrasion, skin needling or extractions
  • Mixed with a light moisturiser to enhance its hydrating antioxidant and nutritional efficacy
  • It can also be applied under a moisturiser to extend the duration of its hydration effect.

When taken internally as a supplement rosehip oil will provide further skin support. 

Studies also confirm rosehip oil’s benefit for arthritic conditions in providing pain relieve due to its anti-inflammatory properties, as well as its impressive polyphenols, anthocyanins and vitamin C antioxidant profile.

The newest edition of APJ is out soon! Subscribe today